Southern collard greens recipe - how to cook them

If you're a fan of soul food from the South, you're going to adore this collard greens recipe.

Here I show you how to prepare collard greens the way your grandmother would have.

Results are deliciously tender and flavorful.

collard greens in large pot with wooden spoon to the side

Managing a batch of collard greens can be a bit of a challenge. They may still have sand in them despite a thorough washing if they weren't properly cleaned.

Nothing is more revolting than eating some collard greens only to find that they taste like grits of sand.

They are crunchy and tough if you don't cook them long enough.

Bitter and earthy flavors emerge if you don't season them properly.

HOWEVER If you can avoid these pitfalls, they are a wonderful Southern accompaniment that will fill you up with comfort.

These greens are a complete meal in and of themselves when served with cornbread and vinegar or hot sauce.

Learn the best way to prepare collard greens by watching this video.

In this article, you will learn the secrets of Southern collard green preparation used by the best home cooks in the South.

Ingredients to cook collard greens-ham hocks, chicken broth, collard greens, and hot sauce

Ingredients

To prepare delicious collards, you will need:

  • chicken broth- Chicken broth is a great flavor enhancer, but water works just as well.
  • substitute smoked turkey wings, turkey neck bones, or bacon for the ham hocks If you're going to use bacon, you need to cook bacon after it's been chopped. Grease should not be cleaned off. Next, pour in the stock.
  • Collard greens, in my opinion, are best when they are raw and unpackaged. Pre-packaged collards frequently come with a tangle of extra stems.
  • sauces with a lot of heat - these are not required It's a nice way to kick up the flavor.
steps on how to cook collard greens

Cooking collard greens

  1. Use any smoked meat you like to make a hearty broth. Tender, flavorful collards are a breeze to make thanks to the broth. Prepare the collards while the broth simmers.
  2. You should really clean your collard greens.
  3. Cut out the collard green's central stem. This is a tough, bitter, and unpalatable section. There will be no need to strip the smaller, younger leaves. Then, slice your leaves into thin ribbons. (As seen above)
  4. Toss the collard greens into the boiling broth in large quantities. You can't possibly fit them all in at once. Put in a lot, cover, and simmer for 2 minutes. Take off the cover and toss the collards together. You can now deposit a second substantial sum. So long as the pot is still empty, continue doing this. Even though 3 pounds of collard greens may seem like a lot, they will shrink to about half their original size once cooked. Cover and cook for an additional hour over low heat, stirring occasionally, once everything is added.
  5. Check for doneness with a taste after an hour. Cook them for an additional 15 minutes if they are not completely tender and flavorful. Ordinarily, an hour is sufficient. The collards will soak up most of the liquid. Cornbread tastes great dunked in the leftover pot likker.
  6. The meat from the smoked ham hocks is very tasty. Put the ham meat back in the collards. In order to accomplish this, excess fat and skin must be trimmed away. Next, collard greens should be tossed with diced meat. You can skip this if you want.
cooked collard greens in a large pot with ham hock

Preparing collard greens for eating

Sand is ideal for planting collards. As a result, their stalks frequently show signs of caked-on sand and dirt.

Sand can often remain on them even after a thorough rinsing.

Wash collard greens by following these steps:

  • Put the collards in the kitchen sink and cover them with water. Let them soak for about 10 minutes.
  • For stubborn grime, swivel them up and down and side to side.
  • Then, give each one a quick shower to make sure no traces of sand are left.

What kind of smoked meat works best when preparing collards?

When I'm making collard greens in the Southern style, I like to use ham hocks that have been smoked.

Smoked turkey neck bones and turkey wings are also acceptable substitutions.

Bacon is a staple in my mom's kitchen. Half a pound of bacon should be sufficient. Bacon is cooked in chicken broth after being cut into pieces and cooked. Avoid washing off the grease. This is what gives the broth its flavor.

Southern Collard Greens in a pot with ham hock

Where can I find a recipe that removes the bitterness from collard greens?

Collard greens can be made less bitter by trimming off the woody ends of the stems and cooking them with smoked meat.

But some folks season their collards with a splash of vinegar, too.

Vinegar enhances the flavor and neutralizes any bitterness.

I find that it's more enjoyable to let each individual decide how much vinegar they'd like to add.

Though apple cider vinegar is the standard condiment for collard greens, some diners prefer white vinegar and others prefer hot sauce.

Since this is the case, I always prepare a selection of vinegars and hot sauces to accompany the collard greens I cook. If you like things really spicy, try my pickled hot peppers and hot jalapeo relish on collards.

For those who prepared their Southern collard greens with a ham hock, note that the ham hock can be removed and the leftover ham on the bone can be used to make delicious meatballs. Finally, put the ham back in for some added flavor.

If you want to freeze collards, can you?

Freezing collards is simple. Sometimes I'll make a double portion and stick one in the freezer.

Cooked collard greens can be frozen in an airtight container after they have cooled. Chill for up to three months Defrost and reheat in a stovetop or microwave oven before serving.

How to cook collard greens

See also, if you enjoy this dish:

Make these collard greens and let me know what you think in the comments. I hope to hear from you soon. So will the people who read my blog.

Tag @aforkstale and #aforkstale in an Instagram or Facebook post featuring your Instant Pot Fried Cabbage, and we'll regram it. Those who follow me will hear about it from me. xoxo

How to cook collard greens- Southern Collard Greens Recipe
  • A large stockpot of chicken broth and smoked meat. (If you're going to use bacon, first chop it and then fry it. Grease should not be cleaned off. Soup stock is next. Cook, covered, over low heat for 45 minutes.  
  • Put the collards in the kitchen sink and cover them with water. Let them soak for about 10 minutes. To remove any remaining grime, swish them up and down and side to side. Then, give each one a quick rinse to make sure no sand is left behind.
  • The collard green leaf's central stem must be removed. Smaller, more delicate leaves on young plants do not require stripping. Next, slice your leaves into thin ribbons.
  • Collard greens should be added to the broth in large batches. As a result, you won't have enough room to insert them all at once. A large quantity can be added, covered, and cooked for about 2 minutes. Take the cover off, and stir the collards around. This will free up some capital for a second sizable investment. Repeat this process until the kettle is full. Although 3 pounds of collard greens may seem like a lot, they will shrink to about half their original size once cooked.  
  • As soon as they are all incorporated, sprinkle on the hot sauce and stir. cover and simmer for an hour, stirring occasionally. After an hour, you can do a taste test to determine if they are done. Cook for an additional 15 minutes if they are not completely tender and flavorful. It usually only takes an hour, but occasionally more time is needed. The collard greens will soak up most of the liquid. Pot likker, the leftover broth, goes well with cornbread.
  • Modify with salt and pepper to taste. Accompany with a splash of apple cider vinegar, vinegar, or spicy sauce  
Take note: any leftover ham on the bone from cooking these Southern collard greens with a ham hock can be used in place of the ham hock. The ham should be re-added at this point for flavor.
Calories: 222 kcal | Carbohydrates: 8 g | Protein: 19 g | Fat: 13 g | In regards to saturated fats: 4 g | Cholesterol: 57 mg | Sodium: 738 mg | Potassium: 598 mg | Fiber: 5 g | Sugar: g | Vitamin A: 6830 IU | Vitamin C: 59.8 mg | Calcium: 335 mg | Iron: 1.8 mg
Tag #aForksTale or tweet at @aForksTale
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